FOOD SAFETY MANAGER TRAINING, FOOD SAFETY TRAINING ORANGE COUNTY, FOOD SAFETY TRAINING ORANGE COUNTY CA, FOOD SAFETY ORANGE COUNTY, State Certification

ServSafe(R) Food Safety Manager Training - Call Today (949) 872-1602
The Health Department Requires Managers or Owners to Be Certified Every 5 Years.

Food safety has universal appeal. We are all consumers; we all want safe food.
Food Safety Manager Training and Certification Testing is Provided by Qualifed and Certified ServSafeTraining Professionals
 

Food Safety Training
Orange County

.com


Food Safety
IN ORANGE COUNTY


Class Location:

The University of San Clemente

In the Icons Room

111 W. Avenida Palizada, Suite E
San Clemente , CA 92672

CALL US TODAY
(949) 872-1602

REGISTER ONLINE!!
CLICK HERE

Sign-up for future classes

Email:

Learn@FoodSafety
OrangeCounty.com

READ OUR REVIEWS

Read About us On:
INCREDELICIOUS
GOOGLE
YAHOO

GREAT ARTICLES:
ARTICLE 1:
Shut down & fined for breaking food safety laws (174)
ARTICLE 2:
Food Safety Temperature Guidelines - What You Need to Know (115)
ARTICLE 3:
The Five Second Rule
ARTICLE 4:
Hazard Analysis in Food
ARTICLE 5:
Harmful Bacteria in Your Kitchen
ARTICLE 6:
How to Avoid Spoilage and Harmful Bacteria from Leftover Food
ARTICLE 7:
Food Poisoning - Causes, Symptoms, Treatment
ARTICLE 8:
Top 7 Tips for Maintaining Kitchen Food Safety
ARTICLE 9:
HACCP Food Safety (613)
ARTICLE 10:
Microscopic and Macroscopic Identification of Moulds in Food
ARTICLE 11:
Should Hot Food Go Into the Fridge
ARTICLE 12:
Food Safety and Food Poisoning
ARTICLE 13:
Understanding Bacteria and Enzymes
ARTICLE 14:
Types and Prevention of Bacteria
ARTICLE 15:
What is Food Poisoning?
 
ACADEMIC ARTICLES:
ARTICLE 1:
About Food Safety
ARTICLE 2:
About Orange County
 

NOTE: The information and notices contained on this website are intended as general research and information and are expressly not intended, and should not be regarded, as medical, financial or legal advice. The articles are from free sources.


Awarded

Best Value in Food Safety Training

Orange County CA, Visit: OrangeCountyCA
BusinessDirectory.com
 
 

"One of the trends we're seeing in food and agriculture is more and more consumers wanting to know things about their food and where and how it's grown and what's in it," - Dan Glickman, Oxfam America board member & former US Secretary of Agriculture

"Businesses must evolve over time, and as more information on food safety becomes available to the public, those that pro-act to new advances are going to be in a better position." - Roger Berkowitz, President and CEO, Legal Sea Foods

"There is testing done all the way from the farm to the fork. Food companies want to sell safe products, but they also want to protect their brand name, which is most directly influenced by a recall," - Tom Weschler, Strategic Consulting, Inc.

"Stated in the simplest terms, the recognized solution to the problem of foodborne illness is a comprehensive prevention strategy that involves all participants in the food system, domestic and foreign, doing their part to minimize the likelihood of harmful contamination. And that is the strategy mandated by FSMA. It is not a strategy that assumes we can achieve a zero-risk food supply, but it is a strategy grounded in the conviction that we can better protect consumers and the economic vigor of the food system if everyone involved implements reasonably available measures to reduce risk." ?- Michael R. Taylor, FDA's Deputy Commissioner for Foods

.
 

Welcome To:

Food Safety Manager Training
and Certification Testing

SPECIAL PRICING

$139per Person
Register NOW!!!
"CLICK HERE"

(Sign-Up for Future Classes Here)


Who should be certified? California Food Safety Law requires at least one employee at each retail food facility be certified as a food safety person by passing an approved examination. The certified person can be the owner, manager, chef, cook or any employee responsible for safe food handling and who may insure that other employees use proper food handling techniques. The certificate must be renewed every five years.

Topics covered in the training: The intensive training covers: the causes of food poisoning and ways to prevent it, time and temperature controls, cross contamination, cleaning and sanitizing, and pest control. Participation in the training does not guarantee passing of the exam.

Managers Food Safety Class includes: 4 Hours of Training, 2 Hours of Testing.

Comply with New California Food Safety Law

FOOD SAFETY TRAINING AND CERTIFICATION TESTING DATES:
(Pressing on the link will take you to the online sign - up page)


Thursday, November 20, 2014; 9 AM - 4 PM - ServSafe(R) Food Safety Manager Training
This course provides the ServSafe (R) Food Safety Manager training and certification testing in a sin gle day format, with training in the morning, a review after lunch, and certification testing to follow immediately after the review.

 

 

FOR INFORMATION - CALL TODAY (949) 872-1602

SPECIAL PRICING
$139per Person

Register NOW!!!

CLICK HERE

(Sign-Up for Future Classes Here)


ServSafe is One of The Best in Food Safety and Certification Testing

ServSafe(R) Provides an Organized Method
That Helps You To Succeed


ServSafe provides the best educational value in food safety training.

The University of San Clemente, through their association with ServSafe and qualified instructors that are knowledgeable, experienced, and qualified through ServSafe, provide this training and certification testing.

 
 


REVIEWS & Testimonials:
What People are Saying About Sylvia Adler - USANA Health Sciences...

"EXCEEDED MY EXPECTATIONS!"

"I was extremely happy with the workshop presenters. The information exceeded my expectations and the other participants were very helpful in sharing their experiences. I signed up for this course after researching on the Internet. I reviewed a lot of different programs and determined the information was the most thorough and comprehensive."

"EXTREMELY IMPRESSED!"

"My instructor was extremely dynamic in her presentation skills and seemed to take a vested interest in our learning the information. I was very impressed with her background and appreciated hearing her personal experiences which help to bring the information to life!"

"WELL WORTH TIME AND MONEY!"

"Both instructors were very informative and presented very well. The knowledge I gained was great and the interaction was outstanding. Well worth the time and money."

Any Questions? Please give us a call: (949) 872-1602
Please let us know what your questions are, how we can help you. Remember, we are only a phone call away.

 
 
ABOUT FOOD SAFETY

Food safety is a scientific discipline describing handling, preparation, and storage of food in ways that prevent foodborne illness. This includes a number of routines that should be followed to avoid potentially severe health hazards. The tracks within this line of thought are safety between industry and the market and then between the market and the consumer. In considering industry to market practices, food safety considerations include the origins of food including the practices relating to food labeling, food hygiene, food additives and pesticide residues, as well as policies on biotechnology and food and guidelines for the management of governmental import and export inspection and certification systems for foods. In considering market to consumer practices, the usual thought is that food ought to be safe in the market and the concern is safe delivery and preparation of the food for the consumer.

Food can transmit disease from person to person as well as serve as a growth medium for bacteria that can cause food poisoning. In developed countries there are intricate standards for food preparation, whereas in lesser developed countries the main issue is simply the availability of adequate safe water, which is usually a critical item.

In theory, food poisoning is 100% preventable. The five key principles of food hygiene, according to WHO, are:
1. Prevent contaminating food with pathogens spreading from people, pets, and pests.
2. Separate raw and cooked foods to prevent contaminating the cooked foods.
3. Cook foods for the appropriate length of time and at the appropriate temperature to kill pathogens.
4. Store food at the proper temperature.
5. Do use safe water and cooked materials.

ISO 22000
ISO 22000 is a standard developed by the International Organization for Standardization dealing with food safety. This is a general derivative of ISO 9000. ISO 22000 standard: The ISO 22000 international standard specifies the requirements for a food safety management system that involves interactive communication, system management, prerequisite programs, HACCP principles.

Incidence
A 2003 World Health Organization (WHO) report concluded that about 30% of reported food poisoning outbreaks in the WHO European Region occur in private homes. According to the WHO and CDC, in the USA alone, annually, there are 76 million cases of foodborne illness leading to 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths.

WHO and FAO
In 2003, the WHO and FAO published the Codex Alimentarius which serves as a guideline to food safety.

However, according to Unit 04 - Communication of Health & Consumers Directorate-General of the European Commission (SANCO): "The Codex, while being recommendations for voluntary application by members, Codex standards serve in many cases as a basis for national legislation. The reference made to Codex food safety standards in the World Trade Organizations' Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary measures (SPS Agreement) means that Codex has far reaching implications for resolving trade disputes. WTO members that wish to apply stricter food safety measures than those set by Codex may be required to justify these measures scientifically." So, an agreement made in 2003, signed by all member states, inclusive all EU, in the codex Stan Codex 240 - 2003 for coconut milk, sulphite containing additives like E223 and E 224 are allowed till 30 mg/kg, does NOT mean, they are allowed into the EU, see RASFF entries from Denmark: 2012.0834; 2011.1848; en 2011.168, "sulphite unauthorised in coconut milk from Thailand ". Same for polysorbate E 435: see 2012.0838 from Denmark, unauthorised polysorbates in coconut milk and, 2007.AIC from France. Only for the latter the EU amended its regulations with (EU) No 583/2012 per 2 July 2012 to allow this additive, already used for decades and absolutely necessary.

United States
The US food system is regulated by numerous federal, state and local officials. It has been criticized as lacking in "organization, regulatory tools, and not addressing food borne illness."

Federal Level Regulation
The Food and Drug Administration publishes the Food Code, a model set of guidelines and procedures that assists food control jurisdictions by providing a scientifically sound technical and legal basis for regulating the retail and food service industries, including restaurants, grocery stores and institutional foodservice providers such as nursing homes. Regulatory agencies at all levels of government in the United States use the FDA Food Code to develop or update food safety rules in their jurisdictions that are consistent with national food regulatory policy. According to the FDA, 48 of 56 states and territories, representing 79% of the U.S. population, have adopted food codes patterned after one of the five versions of the Food Code, beginning with the 1993 edition.

In the United States, federal regulations governing food safety are fragmented and complicated, according to a February 2007 report from the Government Accountability Office. There are 15 agencies sharing oversight responsibilities in the food safety system, although the two primary agencies are the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), which is responsible for the safety of meat, poultry, and processed egg products, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which is responsible for virtually all other foods.

The Food Safety and Inspection Service has approximately 7,800 inspection program personnel working in nearly 6,200 federally inspected meat, poultry and processed egg establishments. FSIS is charged with administering and enforcing the Federal Meat Inspection Act, the Poultry Products Inspection Act, the Egg Products Inspection Act, portions of the Agricultural Marketing Act, the Humane Slaughter Act, and the regulations that implement these laws. FSIS inspection program personnel inspect every animal before slaughter, and each carcass after slaughter to ensure public health requirements are met. In fiscal year (FY) 2008, this included about 50 billion pounds of livestock carcasses, about 59 billion pounds of poultry carcasses, and about 4.3 billion pounds of processed egg products. At U.S. borders, they also inspected 3.3 billion pounds of imported meat and poultry products.

Industry Pressure
There have been concerns over the efficacy of safety practices and food industry pressure on U.S. regulators. A study reported by Reuters found that "the food industry is jeopardizing U.S. public health by withholding information from food safety investigators or pressuring regulators to withdraw or alter policy designed to protect consumers". A survey found that 25% of U.S. government inspectors and scientists surveyed have experienced during the past year corporate interests forcing their food safety agency to withdraw or to modify agency policy or action that protects consumers. Scientists have observed that management undercuts field inspectors who stand up for food safety against industry pressure. According to Dr. Dean Wyatt, a USDA veterinarian who oversees federal slaughter house inspectors, "Upper level management does not adequately support field inspectors and the actions they take to protect the food supply. Not only is there lack of support, but there's outright obstruction, retaliation and abuse of power."

State and Local Regulation
A number of U.S. states have their own meat inspection programs that substitute for USDA inspection for meats that are sold only in-state. Certain state programs have been criticized for undue leniency to bad practices.

However, other state food safety programs supplement, rather than replace, Federal inspections, generally with the goal of increasing consumer confidence in the state's produce. For example, state health departments have a role in investigating outbreaks of food-borne disease bacteria, as in the case of the 2006 outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (a pathogenic strain of the ordinarily harmless bacteria, E. coli ) from processed spinach. Health departments also promote better food processing practices to eliminate these threats.

In addition to the US Food and Drug Administration, several states that are major producers of fresh fruits and vegetables (including California, Arizona and Florida) have their own state programs to test produce for pesticide residues.

Restaurants and other retail food establishments fall under state law and are regulated by state or local health departments. Typically these regulations require official inspections of specific design features, best food-handling practices, and certification of food handlers. In some places a letter grade or numerical score must be prominently posted following each inspection. In some localities, inspection deficiencies and remedial action are posted on the Internet.

Consumer Labeling
With the exception of infant formula and baby foods which must be withdrawn by their expiration date, Federal law does not require expiration dates. For all other foods, except dairy products in some states, freshness dating is strictly voluntary on the part of manufacturers. In response to consumer demand, perishable foods are typically labelled with a Sell by date. It is up to the consumer to decide how long after the Sell by date a package is usable. Other common dating statements are Best if used by, Use-by date, Expiration date, Guaranteed fresh <date>, and Pack date.

Danger Zone
The temperature range in which food-borne bacteria can grow is known as the danger zone. Food safety agencies, such as the United States' Food Safety and Inspection Service, define the danger zone as roughly 4-5 to 60 °C (39-41 to 140 °F). Potentially hazardous food should not be stored at temperatures in this range in order to prevent foodborne illness, and food that remains in this zone for more than two hours should not be consumed. Foodborne microorganisms grow much faster in the middle of the zone, at temperatures between 21 and 47 °C (70 and 117 °F).

Food-borne bacteria, in large enough numbers, can cause so-called food poisoning, symptoms similar to gastroenteritis or "stomach flu" (a misnomer, as true influenza primarily affects the respiratory system). Some of the symptoms include stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. Food-borne illness becomes more dangerous in certain populations, such as people with weakened immune systems, young children, the elderly, and pregnant women. In Canada, there are approximately 11 million cases of food-borne disease per year. These symptoms can begin as early as shortly after and as late as weeks after consumption of the contaminated food.

Time and temperature control plays a critical role in food safety. To prevent time-temperature abuse, minimize the amount of time food spends in the danger zone. A logarithmic relationship exists between microbial cell death and temperature: a significantly large number of cells may survive slightly lower temperatures. In addition to reducing the time spent in the danger zone, foods should be moved through the danger zone as few times as possible when reheating or cooling. In order to ensure that foods are kept out of the danger zone, the use of food grade thermometers is recommended. Refrigerators should be kept below 4.4 °C (40 °F). To facilitate cooling, food can be layered thinly in a shallow dish to maximize the surface area exposed to the low temperature.

Foods that are potentially hazardous inside the danger zone:
" Meat, fish, poultry
" Eggs and other protein-rich foods
" Dairy products
" Cut or peeled fresh produce
" Cooked vegetables, beans, rice, pasta
" Shellfish
" Sauces, such as gravy
" Sprouts
" Any foods containing the above, e.g. casseroles, salads, quiches

Hazzard Analysis and Critical Control Points

Hazard analysis and critical control points, or HACCP /'hs?p/, is a systematic preventive approach to food safety and biological, chemical, and physical hazards in production processes that can cause the finished product to be unsafe, and designs measurements to reduce these risks to a safe level. In this manner, HACCP is referred as the prevention of hazards rather than finished product inspection. The HACCP system can be used at all stages of a food chain, from food production and preparation processes including packaging, distribution, etc. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) say that their mandatory HACCP programs for juice and meat are an effective approach to food safety and protecting public health. Meat HACCP systems are regulated by the USDA, while seafood and juice are regulated by the FDA. The use of HACCP is currently voluntary in other food industries.

HACCP is believed to stem from a production process monitoring used during World War II because traditional "end of the pipe" testing on artillery shell's firing mechanisms could not be performed, and a large percent of the artillery shells made at the time were either duds or misfiring. HACCP itself was conceived in the 1960s when the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) asked Pillsbury to design and manufacture the first foods for space flights. Since then, HACCP has been recognized internationally as a logical tool for adapting traditional inspection methods to a modern, science-based, food safety system. Based on risk-assessment, HACCP plans allow both industry and government to allocate their resources efficiently in establishing and auditing safe food production practices. In 1994, the organization of International HACCP Alliance was established initially for the US meat and poultry industries to assist them with implementing HACCP and now its membership has been spread over other professional/industrial areas.

Hence, HACCP has been increasingly applied to industries other than food, such as cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. This method, which in effect seeks to plan out unsafe practices based on science, differs from traditional "produce and sort" quality control methods that do nothing to prevent hazards from occurring and must identify them at the end of the process. HACCP is focused only on the health safety issues of a product and not the quality of the product, yet HACCP principles are the basis of most food quality and safety assurance systems,and the United States, HACCP compliance is regulated by 21 CFR part 120 and 123. Similarly, FAO/WHO published a guideline for all governments to handle the issue in small and less developed food businesses.

HACCP and Water Quality Management

The use of HACCP for water quality management was first proposed nearly 20 years ago (Havelaar, A.H. HACCP and Drinking Water Supply. Food Control, Volume 5, Number 3. 1994). Thereafter, a number of water quality initiatives applied HACCP principles and steps to the control of infectious disease from water, and provided the basis for the Water Safety Plan (WSP) approach in the third edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, (2004), which has been described as "a way of adapting the HACCP approach to drinking water systems" (Rosn, L. et al. Generic Framework and Methods for Integrated Risk Management in Water Safety Plans. Techneau, June 2007). The WHO HACCP-based framework, in particular the WSP, has been successfully applied to assessing and managing the risks posed by Legionella in building water systems. (Legionella and the prevention of legionellosis. J. Bartram, et al., Editors, WHO Press, 2007).

 
ABOUT ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA

Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. Its county seat is Santa Ana. According to the 2000 Census, its population was 2,846,289, making it the second most populous county in the state of California, and the fifth most populous in the United States. The state of California estimates its population as of 2007 to be 3,098,121 people, dropping its rank to third, behind San Diego County. Thirty-four incorporated cities are located in Orange County; the newest is Aliso Viejo.

Unlike many other large centers of population in the United States, Orange County uses its county name as its source of identification whereas other places in the country are identified by the large city that is closest to them. This is because there is no defined center to Orange County like there is in other areas which have one distinct large city. Five Orange County cities have populations exceeding 170,000 while no cities in the county have populations surpassing 360,000. Seven of these cities are among the 200 largest cities in the United States.

Orange County is also famous as a tourist destination, as the county is home to such attractions as Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm, as well as sandy beaches for swimming and surfing, yacht harbors for sailing and pleasure boating, and extensive area devoted to parks and open space for golf, tennis, hiking, kayaking, cycling, skateboarding, and other outdoor recreation. It is at the center of Southern California's Tech Coast, with Irvine being the primary business hub.

The average price of a home in Orange County is $541,000. Orange County is the home of a vast number of major industries and service organizations. As an integral part of the second largest market in America, this highly diversified region has become a Mecca for talented individuals in virtually every field imaginable. Indeed the colorful pageant of human history continues to unfold here; for perhaps in no other place on earth is there an environment more conducive to innovative thinking, creativity and growth than this exciting, sun bathed valley stretching between the mountains and the sea in Orange County.

Orange County was Created March 11 1889, from part of Los Angeles County, and, according to tradition, so named because of the flourishing orange culture. Orange, however, was and is a commonplace name in the United States, used originally in honor of the Prince of Orange, son-in-law of King George II of England.

Incorporated: March 11, 1889
Legislative Districts:
* Congressional: 38th-40th, 42nd & 43
* California Senate: 31st-33rd, 35th & 37
* California Assembly: 58th, 64th, 67th, 69th, 72nd & 74

County Seat: Santa Ana
County Information:
Robert E. Thomas Hall of Administration
10 Civic Center Plaza, 3rd Floor, Santa Ana 92701
Telephone: (714)834-2345 Fax: (714)834-3098
County Government Website: http://www.oc.ca.gov

CITIES OF ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA:

City of Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698
City of Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899
City of Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823
City of Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624
City of Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628
City of Cypress, 90630
City of Dana Point, 92624, 92629
City of Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728
City of Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838
City of Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846
City of Huntington Beach, 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649
City of Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710
City of La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633
City of La Palma, 90623
City of Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698
City of Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656
City of Laguna Niguel
, 92607, 92677
City of Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654
City of Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, 92610
City of Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721
City of Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694
City of Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663
City of Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869
City of Placentia, 92870, 92871
City of Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, 92679
City of San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674
City of San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694
City of Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799
City of Seal Beach, 90740
City of Stanton, 90680
City of Tustin, 92780, 92781, 92782
City of Villa Park, 92861, 92867
City of Westminster, 92683, 92684, 92685
City of Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887

Noteworthy communities Some of the communities that exist within city limits are listed below: * Anaheim Hills, Anaheim * Balboa Island, Newport Beach * Corona del Mar, Newport Beach * Crystal Cove / Pelican Hill, Newport Beach * Capistrano Beach, Dana Point * El Modena, Orange * French Park, Santa Ana * Floral Park, Santa Ana * Foothill Ranch, Lake Forest * Monarch Beach, Dana Point * Nellie Gail, Laguna Hills * Northwood, Irvine * Woodbridge, Irvine * Newport Coast, Newport Beach * Olive, Orange * Portola Hills, Lake Forest * San Joaquin Hills, Laguna Niguel * San Joaquin Hills, Newport Beach * Santa Ana Heights, Newport Beach * Tustin Ranch, Tustin * Talega, San Clemente * West Garden Grove, Garden Grove * Yorba Hills, Yorba Linda * Mesa Verde, Costa Mesa

Unincorporated communities These communities are outside of the city limits in unincorporated county territory: * Coto de Caza * El Modena * Ladera Ranch * Las Flores * Midway City * Orange Park Acres * Rossmoor * Silverado Canyon * Sunset Beach * Surfside * Trabuco Canyon * Tustin Foothills

Adjacent counties to Orange County Are: * Los Angeles County, California - north, west * San Bernardino County, California - northeast * Riverside County, California - east * San Diego County, California - southeast

 

"An honest answer is the sign of true friendship."

We receive many customers from across the world including people from the following cities:

Aliso Viejo 92656, 92698, Anaheim 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Atwood, 92811, Brea, 92821, 92822,92823, Buena Park, 90620 ,90621,90622, 90624, Capistrano Beach, 92624, Corona del Mar, 92625, Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress, 90630, Dana Point, 92629, East Irvine, 92650, El Toro, 92609, Foothill Ranch, 92610, Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728, Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843 ,92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach , 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92617, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92697, La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma, 90623, Ladera Ranch, 92694, Laguna Beach , 92651, 92652, Laguna Hills ,92653, 92654,92607,92677, Laguna Woods, 92637, Lake Forest, 92630, Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721, Midway City, 92655, Mission Viejo, 92690, 92691, 92692,Newport Beach , 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, 92657,
Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia, 92870, 92871, Rancho Santa Margarita 92688, San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92693,
Santa Ana , 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705 ,92706, 92707, 92711, 92712, 92725.92735, 92799, Seal Beach , 90740, Silverado 92676, Stanton, 90680, Sunset Beach 90742, Surfside 90743, Trabuco Canyon, 92678, 92679,Tustin ,92780, 92781,92782, Villa Park, 92861,Westminster, 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887

This Institution was Awarded
Best Value in Food Safety Training

Orange County CA, Visit: OrangeCountyCABusinessDirectory.com


Food Safety Training and Testing
Call (949) 872-1602



Website: www.FoodSafetyTrainingOrangeCounty.com

Our EMAIL: Learn@FoodSafetyTrainingOrangeCounty.com

(c) University of San Clemente - 111 W. Avenida Palizada, Suite G, San Clemente, California 92672
UNIVERSITY OF SAN CLEMENTE


FOOD SAFETY MANAGER TRAINING, FOOD SAFETY TRAINING ORANGE COUNTY, FOOD SAFETY TRAINING ORANGE COUNTY CA, FOOD SAFETY ORANGE COUNTY, State Certification, Food Safety Manager Certification, San Clemente,Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, HACCP Principles, haccp certification, HACCP, guidelines for food safety, food service haccp plans, food safety temperatures, food safety spanish language, food safety regulations, food safety program manual, Food Safety Management Systems, Food Safety Certification, food code


Food Safety, Handling, Manager, Training, Testing, Learning, Passing the Test
FOOD SAFETY MANAGER TRAINING IN ORANGE COUNTY
FOOD SAFETY TRAINING
ORANGE COUNTY